Salix species

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Scientific Name Salix brachycarpa USDA PLANTS Symbol
SABR
Common Name Barrenground Willow, Short-fruit Willow ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
22510
Family Saliceae (Willow) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Montane to alpine. Wet meadows, along streams and ponds.
Plant: Bush up to 6 feet tall; erect or sprawling, stout branches; overall grayish-green appearance; new-growth stems are reddish.
Leaves: Pale grayish-green with small hairs on top, whitish and wooly underneath, generally oblong shape.
Inflorescence: Female catkins less than 3/4-inch long and rounded; male catkins less than 1/2-inch long with yellow/reddish anthers.
References: Descr. adapted from "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G.K. Guennel and "A Guide to Rocky Mountain Plants" by Nelson and Williams.
Note: Often growing together with S. planifolia (see photo below).
Colorado Status
Native
Scientific Name Salix glauca USDA PLANTS Symbol
SAGL
Common Name Grayleaf Willow ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
22482
Family Saliceae (Willow) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Upper subalpine and alpine; open, well-drained soils.
Plant: Erect shrub generally 3 to 4 feet tall; taller in favorable sites, but much shorter on exposed tundra sites; overall grayish-green appearance; branches brownish to red-brown; new twigs reddish.
Leaves: Elliptic-shaped, 1 to 1-3/4-inches long, hairy surfaces, bluish-white, waxy coating beneath, entire edges; yellowish petioles 3/8-inch long or less.
Inflorescence: Female catkins 3/4-inch to 2 inches long; male catkins 1/2 to 1-1/4 inches long
References: Descr. adapted from US Forest Service and SEINet.
Colorado Status
Native
Scientific Name Salix planifolia USDA PLANTS Symbol
SAPL2
Common Name Plane-leaf Willow ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
22569
Family Saliceae (Willow) SEINet Reference
Click Here
Description Life zones and habitat: Montane to alpine. Wet meadows, along streams, ponds and boggy areas.
Plant: Bush up to 9 feet tall below timberline; 2 to 3 feet tall in alpine environments; erect or sprawling, stout branches; overall green appearance; new-growth stems are dark, glossy and reddish brown.
Leaves: Smooth green leaves with prominent veins, elliptic or oblanceolate with pointed tips.
Inflorescence: Female catkins up to 2 inches long; male catkins less than 1 inch long with reddish/purple anthers.
References: Descr. adapted from "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G.K. Guennel, "A Guide to Rocky Mountain Plants" by Nelson and Williams, and SEINet.
Note: Often growing together with S. brachycarpa (see photo below).
Colorado Status
Native



© Tom Lebsack 2017