Oenothera species

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Scientific Name Oenothera cespitosa var. cespitosa (Oenthera caespitosa ssp. caespitosa) USDA PLANTS Symbol OECAC2
Common Name Tufted Evening Primrose ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 27383
Family Onagraceae (Evening Primrose) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Plains to montane (4600 to 10000 ft.); dry soils in grasslands and among sagebrush.
Plant: Perennial growing in tufts, up to 12 inches tall, usually stemless; herbage with very short hairs.
Leaves: Basal, petiolate leaves with lanceolate to elliptic blades, 4 to 10 inches long (including petiole) and 3/8 to 1-inch across; margins dentate or irregularly pinnatifid to entire.
Inflorescence: Large, white, showy, solitary flower borne from among the leaves on a short pedicel up to 1-1/4 inches long, petals turning dark rose-purple with age; greenish to reddish floral tube 1-1/2 to 5-1/5 inches long; 4 downward-pointing sepals 3/4 to 2 inches long; protruding style with 4-pronged stigma and 8 protruding white stamens; flowers open around sunset and wilt the next day.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, SEINet and UW Burke Herbarium.
BONAP Distribution Map

Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Oenothera coronopifolia USDA PLANTS Symbol OECO2
Common Name Cut-leaf Evening Primrose, Crownleaf Evening Primrose ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 27387
Family Onagraceae (Evening Primrose) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Plains to montane (3500 to 9700 ft.); sandy soils on hillsides and prairies.
Plant: Perennial growing in clusters, 4 to 24 inches tall, often in colonies; woody, hairy stems.
Leaves: Stem leaves up to 4 inches long deeply pinnately-divided into short, pointed, linear segments.
Inflorescence: Solitary, showy flowers from upper leaf axils with a floral tube 3/8 to 1-1/4 inches long; flowers about 2 inches across with four white (aging pink) petals above four smaller sepals below; protruding style with 4-pronged stigma and 8 protruding white stamens.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield and www.americansouthwest.net.
BONAP Distribution Map

Colorado Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2021