Fragaria species

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Scientific Name Fragaria vesca USDA PLANTS Symbol FRVE
Common Name Woodland Strawberry ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 24634
Family Rosaceae (Rose) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to subalpine (6400 to 10500); moist areas along streams and in woodlands.
Plant: Stemless perennial 4 to 8 inches tall, spreading by hairy runners that root as they go.
Leaves: Shiny, dark green, compound basal leaves with three leaflets, the center one 1/2-inch to 2-1/2 inches long, sharply toothed edges; center tooth at leaflet tip equal in size or extending past adjacent two teeth; upper surface is sparsely hairy, lower surface hairier.
Inflorescence: Cymesof 3 to 15 small white flowers 3/4-inch across with 5 rounded petals; conspicuous, pointed bracts.
Bloom Period: May to July.
Fruit: Conical with seeds projecting out of the surface; about 1/2-inch long or less. References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G. K. Guennel, Missouri Botanical Garden. Jepson eFlora and US Forest Service.
BONAP Distribution Map

Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Fragaria virginiana ssp. glauca USDA PLANTS Symbol FRVIG2
Common Name Wild Strawberry, Mountain Strawberry ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 24641
Family Rosaceae (Rose) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to alpine (6000 to 12700 ft.); woodland openings, meadows, prairies, cleared areas, roadsides and streamsides.
Plant: Stemless perennial 4 to 7 inches tall, spreading by red, hairy runners that root as they go.
Leaves: Bluish green, compound basal leaves with three leaflets, the center one 3/8 to 1-3/4 inches long, shallowly-toothed edges; center tooth at leaflet tip equal in or smaller in size as adjacent two teeth.
Inflorescence: Cymesof 2 to 12 white flowers about 1 inch across with 5 rounded petals; conspicuous, pointed bracts.
Bloom Period: May to July.
Fruit: Ovoid shaped, more rounded and smoother surface than F. vesca; about 1/2-inch long or less.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G. K. Guennel and Missouri Botanical Garden.
BONAP Distribution Map

Colorado Status:
Native



© Tom Lebsack 2020