Allium species

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Scientific Name Allium acuminatum USDA PLANTS Symbol ALAC4
Common Name Taper-tip Onion ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 42707
Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills (5200 to 8500); dry, open areas on hillsides, often with conifers and sagebrush.
Plant: Erect perennial with leafless, greenish-brown stem (scape) 4 to 14 inches tall.
Leaves: Two to four very narrow basal leaves shorter than stem, withering before plant blooms.
Inflorescence: Loose umbel with 10 to 40 flowers; blossoms bell-shaped ~1/4-inch across with 6 pink to rose-purple or white tepals, unequal in length, tapering to a point and spreading to recurved at tip; 2 bracts, 3 to 7 veined beneath.
Bloom Period: May to July.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, www.americansouthwest.net and SEINet.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Allium cernuum USDA PLANTS Symbol
ALCE2
Common Name Nodding Onion ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
42721
Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to subalpine (5500 to 11000); dry, open areas on hillsides and in meadows.
Plant: Erect perennial to 20 inches tall.
Leaves: Basal leaves to 10 inches long, smooth, grasslike, aromatic when crushed.
Inflorescence: Flowers in drooping cluster, individual blossoms 1/4-inch across with 6 pink or white tepals.
Bloom Period: June to August.
References: "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G.K. Guennel and "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Allium geyeri var. geyerii USDA PLANTS Symbol
ALGE
Common Name Geyer's Onion ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
42643
Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) Flora of North America Ref.
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Description Life zones and habitat: Plains to alpine (4500 to 14000 ft); moists areas along streams and in meadows, and alpine environments.
Plant: Erect perennial to 20 inches tall with single, stout stem.
Leaves: Two to three slender basal leaves as long as stem, aromatic when crushed.
Inflorescence: Flowers in small cluster, individual blossoms 3/16-inch across; tepals usually pink, sometimes white; no bulblets.
Bloom Period: May to August.
References: "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G.K. Guennel and "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native



© Tom Lebsack 2021