Lupinus species

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Silvery Lupine (Lupinus argenteus)

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Scientific Name Lupinus argenteus USDA PLANTS Symbol LUAR3
Common Name Silvery Lupine, Silver-stem Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 503575
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to subalpine (4800 to 10500 ft); meadows and open areas, dry or moist, sandy, well-drained soils. Widespread.
Plant: Erect perennial to 2 feet tall, sometimes taller, single to several stems often with very small hairs. Spreads to form colonies.
Leaves: Palmately-divided leaves on long petioles with 5 to 9 leaflets, each narrowly linear to oblanceolate, up to 2 inches long.
Inflorescence: Many pea-like light to dark blue, purple or white blossoms arranged in a raceme 4 to 8 inches long atop each stem, may be hairy. Raceme stem may be reddish.
Bloom Period: May to September.
References: Various.
Notes: Highly variable species in terms of height, leaf shape, hairiness, etc.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Lupinus bakeri USDA PLANTS Symbol LUBA3
Common Name Baker's Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 25961
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills and montane; drier soils in meadows, among sagebrush, and open woodlands.
Plant: Erect perennial 2 to 3 feet tall, with multiple, tufted, reddish stems growing in large clumps.
Leaves: Palmately-divided leaves on long petioles with 7 to 9 leaflets, each narrowly elliptic to lanceolate, 1 to 1-3/4 inches long with acute tips; both surfaces appear pale or ashy with pubescent hairs.
Inflorescence: Many pea-like light to dark blue, to purplish blossoms about 3/8-inch long arranged in whorls in a raceme 4 to 8 inches long; hairy calyx and raceme stem.
Bloom Period: June and July.
References: "Guide to Colorado Wildflowers" by G.K. Guennel, "Pittonia Vol. IV" by Edward L. Greene, page 132 and Wildflowers of the Southerb Rocky Mountains
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Lupinus brevicaulis USDA PLANTS Symbol LUAR3
Common Name Shortstem Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 503576
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Semi-desert to foothills (4700 to 7000 ft); dry, rocky soils in open areas .
Plant: Low, stemless or short-stemmed annual 1 to 3 inches tall, tufted with many petioles radiating from base; foliage covered with long straight hairs.
Leaves: Palmately-divided leaves on petioles 3/8 to 2-3/4 inches long, with 5 to 7 leaflets, each narrowly oblanceolate, 3/8 to 3/4-inch long.
Inflorescence: Dense, nearly spherical clusters less than 1 inch long of 3 to 15 pea-like light to dark blue blossoms on a very short peduncle less than 2 inches long.
Bloom Period: April to June.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, SW Colorado Wildflowers and SEINet.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Lupinus caespitosus USDA PLANTS Symbol LUCA3
Common Name Dwarf Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 25980
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Montain and subalpine; drier, open areas, meadows.
Plant: Short perennial, stemless, 2 to 6 inches tall growing in clumps.
Leaves: Palmately-dissected leaves with 5 to 9 leaflets, each oblong to lanceolate, up to 1 inch long, pointed, with silky hairs.
Inflorescence: Pea-like blue/purple and white blossoms arranged in a raceme 1 or 2 inches long, often partly buried in the leaves.
Bloom Period: June and July.
References: "New Manual Botany of the Central Rocky Mountains (Vascular Plants)" by John M. Coulter, "A Guide to Rocky Mountain Plants" by Nelson and Williams and SW Colorado Wildflowers.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Lupinus caudatus USDA PLANTS Symbol LUCA
Common Name Tailcup Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 25981
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to subalpine (5300 to 10500 ft); dry or moist meadows and open areas, roadsides.
Plant: Erect perennial 8 to 24 inches tall with 1 to several reddish-purple stems extending above the foliage.
Leaves: Palmately-divided leaves on long petioles with 5 to 9 leaflets, each narrowly elliptic to lanceolate, up to 2 inches long; flat or folded, hairy surfaces.
Inflorescence: Many pea-like blossoms arranged in a raceme 2 to 8 inches long atop each stem; corolla light to dark blue, purple or white; banner lighter blue or whitish in the middle, upward-curving and usually hairy on the back; calyx with a short spur.
Bloom Period: May to September.
Fruit: Hairy seed pods 3/4 to 1 inch long containing 4 to 6 seeds.
References: "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield, www.americansouthwest.net, US Forest Service Fire Effects Information System and Montana Field Guide.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native
Scientific Name Lupinus prunophilus (Lupinus polyphyllus var. prunophilus) USDA PLANTS Symbol LUPR2
Common Name Big-leaf Lupine ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 26097
Family Fabaceae (Pea) SEINet
Reference
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Description Life zones and habitat: Foothills to montane (6000 to 10000 ft); dry soils in grasslands, sagebrush meadows, and roadsides.
Plant: Bushy, erect perennial to 40 inches tall, sometimes taller; multiple stems often with very small hairs.
Leaves: Palmately-divided leaves on long petioles with 8 to 12 large, usually flat, broadly to narrowly oblanceolate leaflets; upper surface usually hairless; thinly hairy edges and lower surface.
Inflorescence: Many pea-like blossoms arranged in a raceme 5 to 12 inches long atop each stem and extending well above leaves; flowers pale to dark blue to violet or bicolored, banner with a white spot.
Bloom Period: May to July.
Fruit: Seed pod 1 to 1-5/8 inches long and very hairy.
References: L. prunophilus in SW Colorado Wildflowers and L. polyphyllus var. prunophilus in "Flora of Colorado" by Jennifer Ackerfield.
BONAP Distribution Map
Colorado Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2020